Ocean acidification could threaten Alaska crab populations

KODIAK, Alaska (AP) – Alaska researchers warn that the changing levels of ocean acidity could have grave consequences for red king crab populations in the Bering Sea.

Alaska’s Energy Desk reports that biologist Robert Foy says the ocean acidity could change dramatically over the next 50 years, leading to possible crab stock failure in about 100 years.

Foy directs the Alaska Fisheries Science Center’s Kodiak Laboratory and has been studying the effects of ocean acidification caused by climate change.

Foy says that laboratory tests show that most of the young red king crabs die under water conditions similar to what researchers predict for Alaska.

While some of the crabs survived the very acidic water, indicating there could be the potential to acclimate and adapt, Foy says there might not be enough time.

The post Ocean acidification could threaten Alaska crab populations appeared first on Newstalk 750 – 103.7 KFQD.

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